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Of horse shelters and property rights…

horse shelter

Well played, sir. On another note, do we really own our properties if the city council has veto power over what you build on your own land? Consider, too, the notion of property taxes. Failure to pay them will result in the forced sale of your property. Finally, consider the Kelo decision. The SCOTUS ruled that eminent domain can be applied in cases where a third party can bring in more tax revenue. E.g., a developer can petition the city to condemn and sieze your land because their development will bring in more tax money. With these three…caveats?…does one ever truly own their land?

Image hat tip to Michael Yon

3 Comments

  1. Good find. With the exceptions that the government must collect taxes to fund the proper functions of government and inside a city the city must govern what is built (why is a horse farm inside a city?) I agree with the rest. Government is completely out of control, and things are not looking better in the foreseeable future.

    Posted on 01-Dec-12 at 13:25 | Permalink
  2. CombatRob

    I actually agree a government must collect taxes and that a property tax makes the most sense. I also agree they have an obligation to watch what’s built though it’s definitely become excessive if a farmer can’t build a barn for his horses.

    I just think it’s interesting how we think we own a thing but in reality we do not.

    Posted on 01-Dec-12 at 15:14 | Permalink
  3. don whitmire

    My perspective of property applies to business first and the rest follows. NOT OT. We have the God given right to discriminate without apology or explanation with our hiring employees and renting our property. That is how tradition and culture are preserved as well as keeping out undesirables. The Civil Rights layered on top of the Bill of Rights paved the way for the kind of control in that photo above. The resourcefulness of that rancher gives me pride in our cultural imagination.

    Posted on 08-Dec-12 at 22:03 | Permalink

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